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Universal's Epic Universe Wish List & Speculation

Verdicoshna

Newcomer
Sep 18, 2018
69
I never got to ride it while it was in the park but how was the VR on kraken? If people picked to put on the headset instead of seeing the sights than I would think this could have a good chance of being a magical attraction. Did the VR change the game for Roller Coasters? I'd say no..
 

Alicia

Premium Member
Jul 17, 2014
10,370
Orlando
I never got to ride it while it was in the park but how was the VR on kraken? If people picked to put on the headset instead of seeing the sights than I would think this could have a good chance of being a magical attraction. Did the VR change the game for Roller Coasters? I'd say no..
Coasters were not the right “vehicle” for this technology, and not especially Kraken, which is far too violent to be wearing a heavy headset on.
 

tielo

Veteran Member
Nov 9, 2013
2,217
The Netherlands
We already have a flying bench a flight of the hippogriff and a flying motorbike. I was hoping for a Newt Suitecase ride focused on the fantastical beasts of both series. A dark ride that can be enjoyed by everyone and not coaster fans or people who can't stomach motion sickness. If it can't be to big than make it 2 level Secret Life of Pets size and expand the sets with screens.
A VR experience feels roadside attraction level that fits in City Walk of Disney Springs. I get that this is a next level of that but for me it breaks a ton of immersion with the process of putting the thing on and stapping on a huge thing that should simulate a broomstick for whatever reason.
 

Cup_Of_Coffee

Veteran Member
Aug 7, 2018
4,512
In sure there is a really “Smooth” way Universal can transition us into the VR, I wonder if that dome screen is potentially the same background as whatever our goggles are, so when we put our goggles on it feels less world breaking, just a thought.

I’m a little wary also but I’ve learned to trust Universal. If they were doing this for HTTYD I’d be less excited but since it’s Potter and WB/thou who shall not be named approved, I really have faith this will be a lot of fun.
 

JawsVictim

Veteran Member
Nov 3, 2015
1,333
I dislike the idea of VR attractions in theme parks. They make good up charge attractions (ie The Void or Disney Quest) but it goes against the idea that theme parks are cinematic spaces come to life. I’d rather see a creation of those spaces in a physical sense rather than virtually. Hope there’s something more to this rumor than VR headset + smooth ride vehicle.
 

SkiBum

Veteran Member
Dec 14, 2012
1,480
Cincinnati, OH
I dislike the idea of VR attractions in theme parks. They make good up charge attractions (ie The Void or Disney Quest) but it goes against the idea that theme parks are cinematic spaces come to life. I’d rather see a creation of those spaces in a physical sense rather than virtually. Hope there’s something more to this rumor than VR headset + smooth ride vehicle.
This. While VR/AR can help augment a ride, moving physically through space and scenes cannot be replaced. However, this is only my opinion.
 

Alicia

Premium Member
Jul 17, 2014
10,370
Orlando
VR sounds like a great C or D level attraction that can fit into a smaller space than a traditional dark ride.
I think this is a key point, even with over 100 VR headsets that can run at the same time, this attraction space is still much less than half of the dark ride space next door. We were originally guessing this second attraction would be a tower ride, pretty much based on the fact that the footprint is far too small for anything else. Now, it makes a lot more sense.

I dislike the idea of VR attractions in theme parks. They make good up charge attractions (ie The Void or Disney Quest) but it goes against the idea that theme parks are cinematic spaces come to life. I’d rather see a creation of those spaces in a physical sense rather than virtually. Hope there’s something more to this rumor than VR headset + smooth ride vehicle.
Keep in mind that the queue and preshow spaces for this attraction were designed to be quite large, and certainly incredibly detailed, so it's a big part of the experience itself. That's something of scale you likely won't see at any small VR attraction.

---

I do want to clarify that I am still on the fence about an attraction like this myself, but, I don't want to discount a concept that could be new outright. I feel that we, especially on these forums, tend to hold classic style dark rides to a higher standard than maybe regular guests—and to some extent, perhaps the industry itself.

There are not many "classic" style dark rides planned for Epic Universe at this time. Actually, I think Yoshi is the closest we got. (Maybe the main Wizarding World ride, but the jury is still out on that too.) Universal doesn't seem interested in just creating their own Magic Kingdom here.

Mario Kart uses more AR than we were probably expecting. Monsters sounds like it wants to be an evolution of the FJ style KUKA ride, and Dragons doesn't have a dark ride at all. In fact, the contrast between Disney and Universal can be exemplified by the fact that even the "kiddie" ride section of Epic Universe is mostly made up of thrill rides. The land's spinners can go upside down for God's sake. This isn't your grandpa's Dumbo ride! The main attraction is a roller coaster, and this ain't no Barnstormer.

Even the one ride in dragons suitable for all kids will have them shooting each other with water cannons. Nearly everything designed for this park seems to be interactive, and all in very different ways.

Even Disney themselves seem to have moved on from classic-style dark rides. If Runaway Railway and Rise of the Resistance aren't evidence of that I don't know what is. The use of hologram characters and screens with just a couple select AAs sprinkled in for Rise tells me that the two companies are more alike than fans of either probably care to admit.

Anyway, my point is I guess, is that, to borrow a phrase from bad movie trailers: "the world, is changing."
 

JungleSkip

Premium Member
Feb 15, 2010
21,564
The Mushroom Kingdom
I do want to clarify that I am still on the fence about an attraction like this myself, but, I don't want to discount a concept that could be new outright. I feel that we, especially on these forums, tend to hold classic style dark rides to a higher standard than maybe regular guests—and to some extent, perhaps the industry itself.

There are not many "classic" style dark rides planned for Epic Universe at this time. Actually, I think Yoshi is the closest we got. (Maybe the main Wizarding World ride, but the jury is still out on that too.) Universal doesn't seem interested in just creating their own Magic Kingdom here.

Mario Kart uses more AR than we were probably expecting. Monsters sounds like it wants to be an evolution of the FJ style KUKA ride, and Dragons doesn't have a dark ride at all. In fact, the contrast between Disney and Universal can be exemplified by the fact that even the "kiddie" ride section of Epic Universe is mostly made up of thrill rides. The land's spinners can go upside down for God's sake. This isn't your grandpa's Dumbo ride! The main attraction is a roller coaster, and this ain't no Barnstormer.

Even the one ride in dragons suitable for all kids will have them shooting each other with water cannons. Nearly everything designed for this park seems to be interactive, and all in very different ways.

Even Disney themselves seem to have moved on from classic-style dark rides. If Runaway Railway and Rise of the Resistance aren't evidence of that I don't know what is. The use of hologram characters and screens with just a couple select AAs sprinkled in for Rise tells me that the two companies are more alike than fans of either probably care to admit.

Anyway, my point is I guess, is that, to borrow a phrase from bad movie trailers: "the world, is changing."
I have no problem with non-traditional dark rides.

I just think a VR simulator is just not compelling, especially as one of two rides in a land. As a third ride? Okay, sure, maybe. But as an opening day attraction in the Wizarding World's third land? I dunno. Seems like they can do a lot better.
 

Alicia

Premium Member
Jul 17, 2014
10,370
Orlando
I have no problem with non-traditional dark rides.

I just think a VR simulator is just not compelling, especially as one of two rides in a land. As a third ride? Okay, sure, maybe. But as an opening day attraction in the Wizarding World's third land? I dunno. Seems like they can do a lot better.
Well, technically there is a theater in the middle of the land... sooo, does that count?
 

Cup_Of_Coffee

Veteran Member
Aug 7, 2018
4,512
I think this is a key point, even with over 100 VR headsets that can run at the same time, this attraction space is still much less than half of the dark ride space next door. We were originally guessing this second attraction would be a tower ride, pretty much based on the fact that the footprint is far too small for anything else. Now, it makes a lot more sense.


Keep in mind that the queue and preshow spaces for this attraction were designed to be quite large, and certainly incredibly detailed, so it's a big part of the experience itself. That's something of scale you likely won't see at any small VR attraction.

---

I do want to clarify that I am still on the fence about an attraction like this myself, but, I don't want to discount a concept that could be new outright. I feel that we, especially on these forums, tend to hold classic style dark rides to a higher standard than maybe regular guests—and to some extent, perhaps the industry itself.

There are not many "classic" style dark rides planned for Epic Universe at this time. Actually, I think Yoshi is the closest we got. (Maybe the main Wizarding World ride, but the jury is still out on that too.) Universal doesn't seem interested in just creating their own Magic Kingdom here.

Mario Kart uses more AR than we were probably expecting. Monsters sounds like it wants to be an evolution of the FJ style KUKA ride, and Dragons doesn't have a dark ride at all. In fact, the contrast between Disney and Universal can be exemplified by the fact that even the "kiddie" ride section of Epic Universe is mostly made up of thrill rides. The land's spinners can go upside down for God's sake. This isn't your grandpa's Dumbo ride! The main attraction is a roller coaster, and this ain't no Barnstormer.

Even the one ride in dragons suitable for all kids will have them shooting each other with water cannons. Nearly everything designed for this park seems to be interactive, and all in very different ways.

Even Disney themselves seem to have moved on from classic-style dark rides. If Runaway Railway and Rise of the Resistance aren't evidence of that I don't know what is. The use of hologram characters and screens with just a couple select AAs sprinkled in for Rise tells me that the two companies are more alike than fans of either probably care to admit.

Anyway, my point is I guess, is that, to borrow a phrase from bad movie trailers: "the world, is changing."
And mind you, the one traditional dark ride we may get (Yoshi) people seem to be down on on these forums! Not all but didn’t get a rousing response from what I could read.

This park is pushing boundaries which I love. The main thing in your comment here that I think is not only the purpose of the park, but why SNW needs to be here, interactivity. The feeling I have, is with how many of the rumored attractions involve YOU in some capacity, that Universal wants to make this an extremely “personal” theme park experience. This type of a ride sounds perfect for that then.

I think why I say “personal” though is with the success of the WWoHP, people feel a lot of connection to the area. Not everyone will feel that in all these lands per say, but SNW is proof they can create a damn good land with lots of detail and things to do beyond just “rides!!!”, to me and as someone who vacations here, trust me, that kind of stuff WORKS. Makes me feel connected to the properties, which makes me think of Universal, and it’s a very intimate experience where you feel involved. I’ve said before I love Disney but it feels a lot of “hey, look at this!!!” And Universal is more “Okay, you’re in this with us too”, if that makes sense?

Epic Universe seems to be taking that to another level. SNW as a whole is basically your own video game you’re playing, HTTYD has a ride where you’re literally alone, or competiting with others (again, you’re involved) and now we know that a VR ride is possible. Lots of things where YOU are the focus in these incredible (fantastic?) worlds. Thats my take, this all sounds good to me.
 

belloq87

Veteran Member
Dec 7, 2009
4,621
Universal Exports
There are not many "classic" style dark rides planned for Epic Universe at this time. Actually, I think Yoshi is the closest we got. (Maybe the main Wizarding World ride, but the jury is still out on that too.) Universal doesn't seem interested in just creating their own Magic Kingdom here.

Mario Kart uses more AR than we were probably expecting. Monsters sounds like it wants to be an evolution of the FJ style KUKA ride, and Dragons doesn't have a dark ride at all. In fact, the contrast between Disney and Universal can be exemplified by the fact that even the "kiddie" ride section of Epic Universe is mostly made up of thrill rides. The land's spinners can go upside down for God's sake. This isn't your grandpa's Dumbo ride! The main attraction is a roller coaster, and this ain't no Barnstormer.

Even the one ride in dragons suitable for all kids will have them shooting each other with water cannons. Nearly everything designed for this park seems to be interactive, and all in very different ways.

Even Disney themselves seem to have moved on from classic-style dark rides. If Runaway Railway and Rise of the Resistance aren't evidence of that I don't know what is. The use of hologram characters and screens with just a couple select AAs sprinkled in for Rise tells me that the two companies are more alike than fans of either probably care to admit.

Anyway, my point is I guess, is that, to borrow a phrase from bad movie trailers: "the world, is changing."


While this is undeniably true, seeing it phrased so bluntly is a bummer!
 

Nick

Staff member
Moderator
Sep 22, 2011
23,031
Orlando
VR sounds like a great C or D level attraction that can fit into a smaller space than a traditional dark ride.
VR would be good in a space like Stitches Great Escape. It's not something people are expecting anything big out of, but it could be cool with the restraints they have for what they can actually do in that small building.
 
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PerceptiveCoot

Veteran Member
Jul 13, 2018
1,133
I'm gonna say that I'm fine with VR and screen attractions so long as they are good and are few in the park. So far that seems to be the case with Epic Universe, with most of the rides having some element of physicality, whether that's in a high-tech dark ride or the Dragons roller coaster. It's not like this is USF with Minions, Simpsons, Jimmy Fallon, Shrek 4D, and Fast and Furious relying heavily on motion base, with Simpsons being the only good one out of that whole lot.

EDIT: I also think with the current tech that this might be the most expedient, high-capacity, and inexpensive method there is for providing riders with an individualized broomstick or Quidditch experience.
 

Allomancer

Newcomer
May 22, 2015
85
I'm also fine with VR and screens, though I'm confused as to what most people's boundaries are. For example, Spiderman (my favorite ride of all time) heavily utilizes screens. Are the sets/physical elements in that ride enough to sate most anti-screenz people? Not trying to debate anything, just curious. I'd be very happy with a Monsters ride that has the same balance Spidey does, for example.
 

Alicia

Premium Member
Jul 17, 2014
10,370
Orlando
I'm also fine with VR and screens, though I'm confused as to what most people's boundaries are. For example, Spiderman (my favorite ride of all time) heavily utilizes screens. Are the sets/physical elements in that ride enough to sate most anti-screenz people? Not trying to debate anything, just curious. I'd be very happy with a Monsters ride that has the same balance Spidey does, for example.
Spider-Man is great on its own, (still my favorite Universal ride,) but like @PerceptiveCoot said, it’s when all the rides in a park are screen-heavy, like USF has gotten in recent years, it starts to feel imbalanced.